O245-7: The Skylark Departs

This is a landscape that came a long way to be here. I must have reworked both sky and background about four times each. This is oil on panel, size approximately 60 cm x 45 cm.

O245

Rollo May wrote:

A psychological problem, I have pointed out elsewhere, is like fever; it indicates that something is wrong within the structure of the person and that a struggle is going on for survival. This, in turn, is a proof to us that some other way of behaving is possible. Our old way of thinking—that problems are to be gotten rid of as soon as possible—overlooks the most important thing of all: that problems are a normal aspect of living and are basic to human creativity. This is true whether one is constructing things or reconstructing oneself. Problems are the outward signs of unused inner possibilities.

May, Rollo. Freedom and Destiny (Norton Paperback)

On days when my time and/or energy is low, I turn to charcoal and pastel for relief:

P25
P25 (Pastel and Charcoal on paper, size approximately A4)

This often leads to an effort in oil:

O246
O246: (oil on panel, approx 8 x 10 inches)
O247
O247:: (oil on panel, approx 8 x 10 inches)

There are days when the demands of life, promises made, leaves me depleted and anxious. My approach is to see this anxiety as part of organic life, not as an enemy, but as a source of potential, as Rollo May points out:

The definition of mental health needs to be changed to living without paralyzing anxiety, but living with normal anxiety as a stimulant to a vital existence, as a source of energy, and as life-enhancing.

Here in New Zealand the spring winds and rain are relentless. I lie awake at night, listening to the wind shake anything that can move. I think of small winged creatures huddling outside. And I think of this poem:

Approaching midnight
on a hillside, in springtime,
in a temple hall,
even in my deepest dreams,
the blossoms continue to fall.

Ki No Tsurayuki, translated by Sam Hamill, in
The Poetry of Zen, by Hamill and Seaton

 

Thanks for visiting my blog. I hope you are happy and content.

5 thoughts on “O245-7: The Skylark Departs

  1. I’m looking at these and thinking, “Fritz, paint more skies!” The sky in the first painting at the top of this page struck me hard. I wanted to crop a substantial part of the landscape and emphasise the sky. Bad of me to want to chop your work about, but I’m sure you would tell me to cut something out of a poem if you felt it would work that way.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ha..thanks Marie! You touched a nerve there! thing is, for me skies are quite easy to paint in oils. But to get an interesting, deep moody landscape with a hedgerow or a meaningful furrow to emerge – man, that is hard for me. The road goes on up ahead…

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I do see what you mean, and I love what you put into your landscapes. But painting skies “easy”? I can’t do it, neither can about 98% of all people-who-paint. Anyhow, do what you do and don’t mind MY preferences. 🙂

        Like

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